Publications

USGS Publications

狠狠噜天天噜日日噜Browse more than 160,000 publications authored by our scientists over the past 100+ year history of the USGS.  Publications available are: USGS-authored journal articles, series reports, book chapters, other government publications, and more.

Filter Total Items: 165,245
Year Published: 2020

狠狠噜天天噜日日噜The U.S. Geological Survey and Desert Research Institute, in cooperation with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Victoria County Groundwater Conservation District, Victoria Soil and Water Conservation District, and the San Antonio River Authority, evaluated the hydrologic effects of Vachellia...

Slattery, Richard N.; Ockerman, Darwin J.; Bromley, Matthew; Huntington, Justin; Banta, John R.
Slattery, R.N., Ockerman, D.J., Bromley, M., Huntington, J., and Banta, J.R., 2020, Effects of huisache removal on rangeland evapotranspiration in Victoria County, south-central Texas, 2015–18: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2020–5008, 27 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/sir20205008.

Year Published: 2020

The Boone and Roubidoux aquifers (or their equivalents) are the main sources of fresh groundwater in northeastern Oklahoma. Projected total water demand of both surface water and groundwater in northeastern Oklahoma is expected to increase approximately 56 percent from 2010 to 2060. This report provides an overview of the hydrogeology of...

Russell, Cory A.; Stivers, Jacob W.
Russell, C.A., and Stivers, J.W., 2020, Hydrogeologic units, contour maps, and cross sections of the Boone and Roubidoux aquifers, northeastern Oklahoma, 2020: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3452, 2 sheets, http://doi.org/10.3133/sim3452.

Year Published: 2020

狠狠噜天天噜日日噜This guide describes general protocols and provides templates for news media management at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) and is intended for use by the CVO scientist-in-charge, communications staff, scientists, and guest communications colleagues. This public version, with CVO names and contact...

Driedger, Carolyn L.; Westby, Elizabeth G.
Driedger, C.L., and Westby, E.G., 2020, USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory news media management guide—General protocols and templates: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1462, 46 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/cir1462.

Year Published: 2020

Hydrothermal activity results in the formation of hydrothermal mineral deposits, including seafloor massive sulfide deposits, at oceanic spreading ridges, arcs, and back-arcs. As hydrothermal systems age, the mineral deposits eventually become severed from the heat source and fluid-flow pathways responsible for their formation and become extinct....

Jamieson, John W.; Gartman, Amy

Year Published: 2020

In an effort to determine whether fish populations in an area affected by wood tar waste exhibited health effects, fish were collected and analyzed with histopathology. Multiple species, including Mottled Sculpin (Cottus bairdii), Creek Chub (Semotilus atromaculatus), White Sucker (Catostumus commersonii), Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus),...

Walsh, Heather L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Mazik, Patricia M.; Sperry, Adam J.; Pavlick, Diana
Walsh, H.L., Blazer, V.S., Mazik, P.M., Sperry, A.J., and Pavlick, D., 2020, Assessment of microscopic pathology in fishes collected at sites impacted by wood tar in Pennsylvania: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2020–1024, 14 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20201024.

Year Published: 2020

狠狠噜天天噜日日噜In 1943, Aldo Leopold observed that the real problem of wildlife management is not how to handle wildlife, but how to manage humans. As with any other aspect of wildlife management, social sciences can improve understanding the human dimensions of wildlife disease management (WDM). Human activities have accelerated the emergence of wildlife...

Richgels, Katherine L. D.; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.; Leong, Kirsten; Decker, Daniel J.
Leong, K.M, and Decker, D.J., 2020, Human dimensions considerations in wildlife disease management: U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods, book 15, chap. C8, 21 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/tm15C8.

Year Published: 2020

To better understand the streamflow trends at the streamgages in the Elkhorn River Basin in Nebraska, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Lower Elkhorn Natural Resources District further investigated streamflow trends at the eight streamgages on the Elkhorn River, Salt Creek, and the Lower Platte River that indicated a...

Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Strauch, Kellan R.
Dietsch, B.J., and Strauch, K.R., 2020, Trends in streamflow and precipitation for selected sites in the Elkhorn River Basin and in streamflow in the Salt Creek and Platte River Basins, Nebraska, 1961–2011: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2020–5016, 20 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/sir20205016.

Year Published: 2020

狠狠噜天天噜日日噜The key to Merlin (Falco columbarius) management is maintaining an interspersion of groves of deciduous or coniferous trees for nesting and open grasslands for hunting. Merlins do not build their own nests but rather use former nests of other bird species, including those of corvids (crows, ravens, and magpies) and accipitrids (hawks). In recent...

Konrad, Paul M.; Shaffer, Jill A.; Igl, Lawrence D.
Konrad, P.M., Shaffer, J.A., and Igl, L.D., 2020, The effects of management practices on grassland birds—Merlin (Falco columbarius), chap. R of Johnson, D.H., Igl, L.D., Shaffer, J.A., and DeLong, J.P., eds., The effects of management practices on grassland birds: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1842, 21 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/pp1842R.

Year Published: 2020

Keys to Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii) management include providing suitable grassland habitat, especially native prairie, with intermediate vegetation height and low visual obstruction, and controlling succession therein. Sprague’s Pipits have been reported to use habitats with no more than 49 centimeters (cm) average vegetation height, 4–14...

Shaffer, Jill A.; Igl, Lawrence D.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Sondreal, Marriah L.; Goldade, Christopher M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.; Wooten, Travis L.; Thiele, Jason P.; Euliss, Betty R.
Shaffer, J.A., Igl, L.D., Johnson, D.H., Sondreal, M.L., Goldade, C.M., Nenneman, M.P., Wooten, T.L., Thiele, J.P.,and Euliss, B.R., 2020, The effects of management practices on grassland birds—Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii), chap. W of Johnson, D.H., Igl, L.D., Shaffer, J.A., and DeLong, J.P., eds., The effects of management practices on grassland birds: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1842, 21 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/pp1842W.

Year Published: 2020

Executive SummaryPopulations of federally endangered Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, and Clear Lake Reservoir (hereinafter referred to as Clear Lake; fig. 1), California, are experiencing long-term declines in abundance. Upper Klamath Lake populations are decreasing...

Bart, Ryan J.; Burdick, Summer M.; Hoy, Marshal S.; Ostberg, Carl O.
Bart, R.J., Burdick, S.M., Hoy, M.S., and Ostberg, C.O., 2020, Juvenile Lost River and shortnose sucker year-class formation, survival, and growth in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon and Clear Lake Reservoir, California—2017 Monitoring Report: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2020–1025, 36 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20201025.

Year Published: 2020

The San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado have long been known as a site of exceptionally voluminous mid-Tertiary volcanism, including at least 22 major ignimbrite sheets (each 150–5,000 km³) and associated caldera structures active at 34–23 Ma. Recent volcanologic and petrologic studies in the San Juan region have focused mainly on several...

Lipman, Peter W.
Lipman, P.W., 2020, Geologic map of the Bonanza caldera area, northeastern San Juan Mountains, Colorado: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3394, pamphlet 73 p., 2 sheets, scale 1:50,000, http://doi.org/10.3133/sim3394.

Year Published: 2020

狠狠噜天天噜日日噜Executive SummaryLarval Pacific lamprey live for several years burrowed in nearshore sediments where they filter feed on detritus and organic matter. Dewatering of larval habitat can occur as a result of flow-management practices, construction projects, or seasonal closures of irrigation diversions. Effective management of dewatering events...

Liedtke, Theresa L.; Weiland, Lisa K.; Skalicky, Joseph J; Gray, Ann E.
Liedtke, T.L., Weiland, L.K., Skalicky. J.J., and Gray, A.E., 2020, Evaluating dewatering approaches to protect larval Pacific lamprey: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2020–1026, 32 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20201026.